Retrospective: 14 Year Legacy
1/5/2010




Needle Exchange: The First Year
11/8/2009


Nobody likes the idea of drug addicts in their backyard, but New Jersey has a problem: record numbers of HIV cases contracted through shared, contaminated needles.

 

One solution? Needle exchanges. Return used needles and get clean replacements. The controversy? Critics say the pilot programs, now up and running in five cities across the state, do little to promote recovery, and only encourage addiction. Proponents disagree, and describe success stories like that of Roberto Martinez, a former heroin user now enrolled in a Newark-based methadone clinic that his local needle exchange recommended.

 

Reasonable answer to an escalating health scare? Or, an ineffective way to reduce substance abuse, which for many is the real concern?

 

Host Raymond Brown moderates a discussion with the Roseanne Scotti of the Drug Policy Alliance, and former prosecutor and drug enforcement official, Terrence Farley.  




New Jersey: State of Corruption
8/23/2009


44 indicted. Among them: 3 Mayors, 2 Assemblymen, dozens of local government officials.

 

On this edition of Due Process: Corruption in New Jersey. Is it really as bad as it seems?

 

In late July, after a sweeping three-year investigation, the FBI pounced, rounding up a cast of characters that seemed to have little in common - other than a common sting man.  New Jersey business as usual? Or a political ploy during an election year?

 

Sandra King hosts the half-hour with a video overview - and an in-studio discussion about solutions and enforcement strategies, featuring two former New Jersey Attorneys General: Zulima Farber, a partner at Lowenstein Sandler, and former Supreme Court Justice Peter Verniero, a partner at Sills Cummis. 



Madame Justice Sotomayor
8/16/2009


From a Bronx housing project to Princeton, Yale Law, and now the U.S. Supreme Court.

 

On this edition of Due Process: Justice Sonia Sotomayor – her controversial nomination, and her confirmation.

 

As only the third woman to sit on the High Court, and its first Hispanic, Sotomayor faced a barrage of criticism when President Obama announced her nomination in May.  From her speeches to her demeanor to her judicial decisions--all of it was fair game.  But was it fair play?

 

Sandra King hosts the half-hour, including a video look back at the hearings, and an in-studio discussion, featuring: Curt Levey, Executive Director of the DC-based Committee for Justice; Solangel Maldonado, Seton Hall Law Professor; and, Keith Whittington, Professor of Politics at Princeton.



Gangs in NJ & "Moral Panic"
8/2/2009


Drive-bys.  Shootouts. Drug wars. They’re the stuff of headlines. A fact of urban life. And it’s not all random crime and violence.

 

On this edition of Due Process, the problem of gangs in New Jersey - what are we doing; what more can be done. With the help of clips from the Institute for Social Justice documentary, “Moral Panic,” we meet current and former gang members, and delve into the subject in a candid, intimate way.

 

Sandra King and Raymond Brown host an in-studio discussion featuring Cornell Brooks, Executive Director of the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice, NJ Gangs Czar Jose Cordero, and Akintola Hanif, filmmaker and Director of “Moral Panic.”



Voting Rights Act Decision
7/26/2009


It’s been hailed as one of the most significant steps in civil rights history – second only, some say, to Brown v. Board of Education.

 

On this edition of Due Process, the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision on the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and specifically Section 5, the portion of the act at the center of the legal showdown. Initially created to help ease the vestiges of past discrimination against African Americans at the polls, we look at the questions that the Justices decided to sidestep:  whether it’s still necessary andeven more important, constitutional.

 

Sandra King reports on the 8-1 decision, while Raymond Brown hosts an in-studio debate featuring Eric Jaso, former Asst. U.S. Attorney and Board member of The Federalist Society of New Jersey, Myrna Perez, counsel for The Brennan Center for whom she submitted a friend of the court brief in the case, and DeForest “Buster” Soaries, former chair of the U.S. Election Assistance Commission.




Diversity in the Law: Judiciary
5/10/2009


As recently as the 1960s, there were only two minorities on the Superior Court in New Jersey. Today, nearly 15% of the judges in the state are minorities.

 

On this edition of Due Process, the issue of Judicial Diversity, and how a NJ Supreme Court commission, created to address the underrepresentation of minorities on the bench, has helped bring change to a once monochromatic bastion of the law.

 

Sandra King reports on the stories of Judge Claude Coleman and Judge Shirley Tolentino, two lawyers who have helped change the landscape of the judiciary, while Raymond Brown hosts an in-studio debate featuring former NJ Supreme Court Justice James Coleman, the first African American appointed to the state’s highest court, and former NJ Attorney General Zulima Farber.


Workplace Bullying
4/12/2009


No one promised that work would be fun.  But if shouldn't be painful!

 

On this edition of Due Process, the problem of Workplace Bullying - abuse by a boss or fellow worker that is severe enough to cause physical or psychological damage.  Some say the problem is so prevalent that it requires a new statute that would allow a bullied worker to sue an employer, even absent racial, religious, sexual orientation, or gender grounds.

 

Sandra King reports on the case of one bullied public employee, and hosts an in-studio debate featuring employer defense attorney Rosemary Alito, ATLA representative and plaintiff's lawyer Kevin Costello, and NJ State Bar Foundation school bullying expert Leisa Ann Smith.



Megan's Law
4/5/2009


It began in New Jersey 15 years ago when the murder-rape of 7-year-old Megan Kanka launched a nationwide movement - and laws in all 50 states. 

 

The idea was to keep tabs on sex offenders through town by town registries ... and, in the cases of those deemed most likely to strike again, to notify neighbors, schools and community institutions that a potential sexual predator was among them. 

 

But now a federally-funded study by the NJ Department of Corrections concludes that Megan's Law may be a failure - that it hasn't prevented either new sex offenses or repeat offenses.

 

Sandra King looks at the history of the law, its cost, and the DOC study.



Crisis in the Cellblock - Part 2
3/15/2009


One in 100.  More than 2.2 million people.  That's the number of adult Americans in our prisons.  It's a number that's exploded in the last 30 years, since Richard Nixon launched the war on drugs. 


In Part II of this two-program Due Process special, we look for answers. Do they lie in better inmate rehab - or in reform of our drug laws?


Guests for both shows are Gov. Byrne, Justice Poritz and former Newark Chief Judge Julien Neals.



Crisis in the Cellblock - Part 1
3/8/2009


One in 100.  More than 2.2 million people.  That's the number of adult Americans in our prisons.  It's a number that's exploded in the last 30 years, since Richard Nixon launched the war on drugs. 


In Part I of this two-program Due Process special, Sandra King and Raymond Brown look at how we got here - and at what cost.

 

Guests are Gov. Byrne, Justice Poritz and former Newark Chief Judge Julien Neals.








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