Michael Chertoff: The Homeland Security Chief's Exit Interview - Part 2
1/18/2009


He was New Jersey’s U.S. Attorney, and a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals, before President Bush named him to head the Attorney General’s Criminal Division.  With 9/11 he became the AG’s point man on counterterrorism, helping write the controversial Patriot Act, and designing the Administration’s response to the terrorist threat. 


But it was his appointment in 2003 to head the massive Department of Homeland Security – with its 200,000 employees – that put New Jersey’s Michael Chertoff squarely in charge of the fight against terrorism on American soil.  Now, with the entrance of a new President, Michael Chertoff is exiting his critical cabinet post.


On this special two-part edition of Due Process  – an in-depth interview with the controversial Chertoff, conducted by Sandra King, who has covered Chertoff since his days as the state’s top law enforcement officer.  


Michael Chertoff: The Homeland Security Chief's Exit Interview - Part 1
1/11/2009


He was New Jersey’s U.S. Attorney, and a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals, before President Bush named him to head the Attorney General’s Criminal Division.  With 9/11 he became the AG’s point man on counterterrorism, helping write the controversial Patriot Act, and designing the Administration’s response to the terrorist threat. 


But it was his appointment in 2003 to head the massive Department of Homeland Security – with its 200,000 employees – that put New Jersey’s Michael Chertoff squarely in charge of the fight against terrorism on American soil.  Now, with the entrance of a new President, Michael Chertoff is exiting his critical cabinet post.


On this special two-part edition of Due Process –  an in-depth interview with the controversial Chertoff, conducted by Sandra King, who has covered Chertoff since his days as the state’s top law enforcement officer.  



Retrospective 2008
12/28/2008


In what's become an annual tradition on Due Process, Raymond Brown and Sandra King update the year's top justice stories.  With a mix of video clips and conversation, they look back at the stories that broke in 2008, bring them up to date, and reflect on what comes next.  Among the issues on the docket for this edition of Due Process: detentions at Guantanamo, the success of New Jersey's civil union law and the FBI's racial profiling guidelines.



Civil Union Review Commission
12/21/2008


While California voters rejected their State Supreme Court’s decision – saying no to gay marriage with Proposition 8 – New Jersey may be moving toward becoming the third U.S. state to legalize marriage for same sex couples.

   

On this edition of Due Process, Sandra King looks at the new report from this state’s Review Commission, which concludes that civil unions are a failure … that only marriage can produce true equality.


In the studio, Raymond Brown and Sandy moderate an impassioned debate between Elder Kevin Taylor, a member of the Commission, and Rev. Greg Quinlan, a “former homosexual” who opposes gay marriage.



Nick Katzenbach: The Kennedy & Johnson Years - Part 2
11/2/2008


Through eight years of the Kennedy and Johnson Presidencies, he was at the heart of the action – as Bobby Kennedy’s Deputy Attorney General, Lyndon Johnson’s AG and, finally, the Deputy Secretary of State.



As an octogenarian now living in Princeton, Nicholas Katzenbach has a unique perspective on some of the most pivotal events of the 1960’s – a perspective he shares with Due Process Executive Producer/Co-host, Sandra King, in two in-depth half-hours.


 

In the second of the two programs, it’s the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Bay of Pigs, the Kennedy Assassination and the Johnson Years.


Nick Katzenbach: The Kennedy & Johnson Years - Part 1
10/26/2008


Through eight years of the Kennedy and Johnson Presidencies, he was at the heart of the action – as Bobby Kennedy’s Deputy Attorney General, Lyndon Johnson’s AG and, finally, the Deputy Secretary of State.


 

As an octogenarian now living in Princeton, Nicholas Katzenbach has a unique perspective on some of the most pivotal events of the 1960’s – a perspective he shares with Due Process Executive Producer/Co-host, Sandra King, in two in-depth half-hours.


 

In the first of the two programs, the focus is on civil rights, including Katzenbach’s central role in school integration, the March on Washington and the Civil Rights Bill of 1964. 


The Honorable John Gibbons
9/21/2008


He was a Nixon appointee, but federal Judge John Gibbons became known as a liberal as chief of the 3rd Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals.  And since his retirement, Judge Gibbons has continued to put his mark on the law – usually in defense of the underprivileged and under-represented. 



In this intimate, in-depth interview, Raymond Brown draws out the usually reticent Judge Gibbons on everything from Guantanamo detainees to his lifelong opposition to the death penalty.



Raising the Bar
8/24/2008


Jerry Kellerman tries to find justice in a system plagued with corruption, bias and incompetence. He’s a new kind of TV lawyer, and if his passionate public defender rings true, that may be because he is based on, and created by, former P.D.-turned professor- turned TV producer: Seton Hall Law’s David Feige.


Sandy King and Ray Brown sit down with Professor Feige to preview and discuss “Raising the Bar” - the new weekly drama he’s producing with TV veteran Steven Bochco for TNT - and the uplifting and heartbreaking conflicts he witnessed in and out of court as chief of the groundbreaking Bronx Defenders.



FBI Guidelines
8/10/2008


The government’s investigation of U.S. citizens, in the absence of a crime, with no reason for suspicion.  Until now, it’s been against the law.  But proposed new FBI guidelines could change that, allowing citizens to be investigated for a new set of reasons – including race, religion and ethnicity. 

 

On this edition of Due Process, a new chapter in racial profiling.  Sandra King looks at the history of the FBI, and the vulnerability of certain communities following 9/11, while Raymond Brown’s studio guests are Rutgers Law School professor Frank Askin, who is also general counsel and national board member of the ACLU and Professor Jan Ting, who teaches at the Beasley School of Law at Temple University in Philadelphia and is a former Assistant Commissioner at the Immigration & Naturalization Service of the U.S. Department of Justice.



The Second Amendment - Defined
8/3/2008


The right to own guns.  It’s in the Constitution – in the Second Amendment.  But is it an individual right, or just the right to participate in a “well-regulated state militia”? The U.S. Supreme Court has never answered that question – until now. In a 5-4 decision, the court ruled with gun advocates, overturning a District of Columbia gun ban.


In this edition of Due Process, Sandra King tracks the longtime fight over gun rights, and its origins in the legends of the Old West.  In the studio, Raymond Brown moderates a spirited debate with gun rights advocate Gary Needleman, Ceasefire NJ President Thomas Jardim and Seton Hall Law Professor Edward Hartnett.



The Glass Ceiling
7/6/2008


They now make up fully half of the law school graduates around New Jersey and the nation.  Then why do they still seem to lag behind when it comes to “making it” in private practice? 

 

If private firm partnerships are a gauge of success, how to account for the fact that only 26% of all partners are women, while only 16% of equity partners are female.

 

On this edition of Due Process, Sandra King reports on a woman who opted out of a big firm to form her own women-only firm.  Her reason: the glass ceiling.

 

And in the studio, Raymond Brown moderates a spirited debate with Peggy Sheahan Knee, president of the New Jersey State Bar Association; and Rosemary Alito, a high-profile partner, who may have cracked the glass ceiling, and with a feminist perspective former NOW-NJ president Myra Terry.



Civil Union vs. Marriage
6/29/2008


California’s high court has said “yes.”  So now there are two states with legal same sex marriage.  Add to that the decision by New York’s new Governor to recognize all out-of-state marriages – and the question raised is, “what’s next?”  Is gay marriage inevitable for this state and for this country?


On this edition of Due Process, Sandra King profiles a couple whose story shows that New Jersey’s civil union law may not go far enough. 


In the studio, Raymond Brown moderates an impassioned debate with Demetrios Stratis, an attorney with the New Jersey Family Policy Council; Garden State Equality Founder Steven Goldstein, and Seton Hall Law Professor Marc Poirier, a specialist in gender issues.



Guantanamo: Law School Lessons
4/20/2008


Guantanamo - that prison camp in a corner of Cuba, not quite on U.S. soil.  Since 2002, it's been at the center of an international debate.  Is it a necessary step in ensuring our national security - or is it a national disgrace? 


Three years ago, a Seton Hall law professor and his Center for Policy and Research began probing that question, by scrutinizing thousands of government documents.  Mark Denbeaux and his student researchers asked: "Whom are we holding."  their conclusion was: "the wrong people." 


On this edition of Due Process, we look at Guantanamo as a teaching tool ... but also as a controversial piece of the larger war on terror.  In the studio: Jonathan Hafetz of the NYU Brennan Center for Justice and Commander Thomas Fichter, JAG, of the U.S. Naval Reserve.



Byrne at 84
4/13/2008


“OTB” was what they called him, “One Term Byrne” - the result of his wildly opposed state income tax.


But New Jersey’s 47th Governor did win four more years, leaving his mark on every aspect of state government – from Atlantic City gambling to Pinelands preservation, from reform of school financing to revision of the State Criminal Code.


And the man who may have been New Jersey’s most despised head of state, may today be its most loved.


Just turned 84 and still practicing law – and playing tennis - Byrne’s life and work are the focus of an in-depth half-hour with Sandra King on this week’s special edition of “Due Process.”



Slavery Apology
2/11/2008


One New Jersey historian calls it "New Jersey's dirty little secret."  Slavery, right here in the Garden State.  It's a long and largely unknown chapter of state history, so when the Legislature issued a formal apology, it raised some questions ... and more than a little controversy. 


In this edition of Due Process, we examine the truth of slavery in New Jersey from its earliest colonial stage through the Civil War.  In 1800, there were 14,000 slaves in this state, and slavery wouldn't be abolished here until 1844 ... its illegality not a part of the State Constitution until 1866. 


In a field piece that takes us from the apology dispute in the Assembly to a series of unheralded historic sites in South Brunswick, Newark and Montclair, Sandra King - with the help of Rutgers Historian Clement Price - uncovers the "secret" of NJ slavery and sets the stage for the studio debate.  Raymond Brown's guests are Assemblyman Michael Patrick Carroll, African Studies Prof. Barbara Wheeler and reparations advocate Diane Sammons.   



American Gangster - Real Players
2/4/2008


On this edition of "Due Process": the truth behind "American Gangster," Hollywood's version of the rise and fall of a heroin kingpin ... and the cop-turned-prosecutor who tried him and then befriended him.  Who could have guessed that 30 years after Newark Narcotics Prosecutor Richie Roberts helped to topple Teaneck drug lord Frank Lucas, they'd be played in the movies by Denzel Washington and Russell Crowe?

 

In the opening field piece, Sandra King talks to Lucas, now a self-styled youth counselor; to Essex Sheriff Armando Fontoura and to two of the cops who actually brought Frank Lucas down.  In the studio, Raymond Brown talks one-on-one with Roberts about his real role in the Lucas case 30 years ago ... and his unlikely relationship with Lucas today.






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