Justice Breyer: On Democracy Part II
6/19/2011


In Part II of this Emmy Award winning two-program Due Process special, Hosts Raymond Brown and Sandra King continue their candid conversation with United States Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer.


Taped on location at Rutgers Law School, before an audience of students, academics, jurists and lawyers, the two programs cover a wide range of court cases and conflicts - from Dred Scott and the Cherokee Nation decisions in the 19th Century, to Korematsu and Brown in the 20th, and Bush v. Gore and the Guantanamo cases in the 21st.


Justice Breyer's book, "Making Our Democracy Work," cites those cases and more in his argument that a strong democracy is dependent, not just on the division of powers, but on a Court that commands the respect of the American citizenry.


Although the interview is conducted by Sandy and Raymond, the programs also feature enthusiastic participation from the audience, with questions from such notables as former NJ Supreme Court Chief Justice Deborah Poritz, NJ Institute for Social Justice President Cornell Brooks and Rutgers Law Prof. Paul Tractenberg.


Justice Breyer: On Democracy Part I
6/12/2011


In Part I of this Emmy Award winning two-program Due Process special, Hosts Raymond Brown and Sandra King have the rare opportunity for an extended, candid conversation with one of the most engaging members of the United States Supreme Court - Justice Stephen Breyer.


Taped on location at Rutgers Law School, before an audience of students, academics, jurists and lawyers, the two programs cover a wide range of court cases and conflicts - from Dred Scott and the Cherokee Nation decisions in the 19th Century, to Korematsu and Brown in the 20th, and Bush v. Gore and the Guantanamo cases in the 21st.

Justice Breyer's book, "Making Our Democracy Work," cites those cases and more in his argument that a strong democracy is dependent, not just on the division of powers, but on a Court that commands the respect of the American citizenry.


Although the interview is conducted by Sandy and Raymond, the programs also feature enthusiastic participation from the audience, with questions from such notables as former NJ Supreme Court Chief Justice Deborah Poritz, NJ Institute for Social Justice President Cornell Brooks and Rutgers Law Prof. Paul Tractenberg.



DREAM Act: Dead or Deferred?
4/24/2011


They've been raised in this country, educated here.  They look, act and feel like any other American kids.  What they lack is an American birth certificate, a Social Security number, and the rights and privileges they bring.   They are the hundreds of thousands of young people for whom the DREAM Act would have been a life changer - but it failed.


In Sandra King's opening field piece we meet Marisol Conde-Hernandez, brought to New Jersey from Mexico at just 18 months - a Rutgers senior, who won't even be able to get a job at McDonald's once she graduates.  Unlike most undocumented students, Marisol hasn't stayed in the shadows.  She fought for the DREAM Act and was devastated when it didn't pass.


On this edition of Due Process, we ask, The DREAM Act: Is it Dead or Just Deferred?


Raymond Brown's studio guests: DREAM Act advocate Prof. Wilfredo Caraballo of Seton Hall Law School; Act opponent Prof. Jan Ting of Beasley  School of Law at Temple University, and Newark Attorney Larry Lustberg, chair of the Immigration Committee of the NJ Advisory Board to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission.



SCOTUS Update 2011
4/17/2011


It's that time of the year: U.S. Supreme Court "prime time."  With just two weeks to go before The Court stops hearing cases ... and the bulk of Court decisions scheduled to come down in the next two months ... it's the time that Due Process traditionally looks at the High Court's year in law and justice.

 

Our special guest, to help us sort through this Supreme Court term: Steven Shapiro, National Legal Director of the ACLU, who has the unique ability to present both sides of an issue - even when his staff of 90 lawyers is an advocate in the case.  In fact, this year, the ACLU is a participant in 25% of the 80 cases that The Court agreed to hear.

 

In his conversation with Raymond Brown and Sandra King, Shapiro provides a balanced insider look at cases that range from California's attempt to ban violent video games to Arizona's program of providing state aid to parochial schools - from claims of extraordinary rendition in the name of fighting terrorism to the case of an exonerated death row inmate whose $14 million jury award was overturned by The Court.

 

But Shapiro says that as he sat through case after case this year, what struck him most was the image of three women - and two people of color - on a bench that was, historically, a white male bastion.



Mandatory Retirement for Judges
2/20/2011


Two US Supreme Court justices didn't leave the bench until age 90.  And for any federal judge, the job's for life.  But, in New Jersey, there's a mandatory retirement age, and when a jurist turns 70, it's "Happy Birthday and Goodbye."


On this edition of Due Process, Sandra King's field report focuses on Superior Court Judge Claude Coleman's recent forced retirement, and asks the question: Should a 64 year old rule be revised upward? That question answered by numerous New Jersey legal figures, including former Supreme Court Justice James H. Coleman, forced into retirement himself nearly 8 years ago.


In the studio, Sandy and Raymond Brown explore the pros and cons of mandatory retirement with two former Chief Justices of the NJ Supreme Court: Deborah Poritz and James Zazzali.



Homeland Security: The New Realities Post 9/11
2/13/2011


It changed the way we think, the way we live ... what we fear.  So when Rutgers Law Review called a major two-day national conference to explore the impact and the consequences of the attacks, Due Process was there.


In this special edition of the award-winning series on law and justice, Sandra King's field report features a range of conference participants, among them:

  • Former U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff

  • Gov. and 9/11 Commission Co-chair Tom Kean

  • NJ Homeland Security Director Charles McKenna

  • Former Third Circuit Chief Judge John Gibbons

  • Former Guantanamo Muslim Chaplain James Yee


And, in the studio, Rutgers Law Dean James Farmer, senior counsel to the 9/11 Commission and former NJ Attorney General, takes on the tough questions from Raymond Brown ... along with Brooklyn Law School Prof. Susan Herman, national president of the American Civil Liberties Union.






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